My Favorite Horror Comedies

As promised on social media, I will bring the countdown of my 100 favorite horror movies back from the dead starting tomorrow night. In the meantime, I thought I would whet your appetite with my five favorite horror comedies. This sub genre has produced a few of the most beloved films of all time and each of the movies I am about to present have a special place where my heart used to be. The funny thing is, some horror comedies were never intended to be funny, they just turned out that way. It’s a hard genre to pin down. Quick web searches for the term “horror comedies” produces head-scratching results. I better stop that and get to the list. They say nothing bleeds like a scalp wound.

MV5BMTEzNjkwMzIyMjZeQTJeQWpwZ15BbWU4MDI2NTU5ODYx._V1_SY1000_SX670_AL_5. Tremors

I love creature features. Monster movies are some of my favorite things to watch, especially the giant bug movies of the 1950s – Them, Tarantula, The Deadly Mantis, etc. Tremors, starring Kevin Bacon and Fred Ward, is a send-up of all of the great b-movies of the 1950s and 1960s. Bacon and Ward live in a small desert community. The discovery of giant worm-like creatures dubbed “graboids” sends everyone into a tizzy. Michael Gross, Ariana Richards (Jurassic Park) and Reba McEntire also star. Finn Carter plays the scientist who first discovers the giant worms. The townsfolk gather together to fight the monsters with Gross and McEntire playing doomsday preppers who are armed to the teeth.

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This is the film that put Simon Pegg on everyone’s radar. This send up of zombie films written by Pegg and Edgar Wright, and directed by Wright, is as much satire on the doldrums of every day life, loves and loves lost, as it is zombie film. Nick Frost co-stars with Pegg, a future frequent team-up, as two pals who are besieged by an outbreak of the undead. Hilarity ensues as Shaun and Ed (Frost) concoct a plan to rescue Shaun’s now ex-girlfriend Liz and his mom, and begrudgingly his step-father (played by the wonderful Bill Nighy) and his ex-girlfriend’s pals. The movie is well-written and well-acted with several side-splitting scenes. Many zombie movie tropes are skewered and one of the funniest scenes involves Shaun and Ed trying to kill a pair of zombies by flinging vinyl record albums at their heads. The music and pop culture references are enough to make this film enjoyable.

MV5BMjAwNDA5NzEwM15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMTA1MDUyNDE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,674,1000_AL_3. What We Do in the Shadows

New Zealand’s Jemaine Clement of Flight of the Conchords fame is becoming a Hollywood powerhouse. He has done some pretty good voice over work to go along with his acting. He is also a writer and a director. Perhaps his best work to date is the vampire film, What We Do in the Shadows. Written and directed by Clement and Taika Waititi, this irreverent take on vampire myth and lore is filmed documentary style, almost MTV Cribs style. A reality TV crew follows a group of idiot vampires who each has unique traits or abilities. The bottom line is, none of them really know how to vampire. IMDB describes the movie this way: “Viago, Deacon and Vladislav are vampires who are finding that modern life has them struggling with the mundane – like paying rent, keeping up with the chore wheel, trying to get into nightclubs and overcoming flatmate conflicts.” It’s like Friends meets Keeping Up with the Kardashians, only with vampires. The film has spawned a popular TV series of the same name. The film and the series are hilarious.

MV5BNTZiZTQ4YjItY2Y4ZC00MTVhLThmYTEtYWM5NmRlNDI5Y2JmXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNDY2MTk1ODk@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,657,1000_AL_2. Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

I almost forgot about this one. I grew up on Universal Horror, fell in love with Universal Horror. Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolf-Man, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, and all their sequels. I also grew up on Abbott and Costello films and routines. Their “Who’s on first?” sketch remains one of the funniest and timeless bits ever written and performed. There wasn’t much taste for horror films in the 1940s because of World War II. The world had witnessed enough horror. Universal decided to trot their beloved monsters out for one more go-round, this time with Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. The best of the batch was Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein. This film marked only the second time Bela Lugosi played Dracula on the big screen. And it would be his last. Lon Chaney, Jr., reprises his role as Larry Talbot/The Wolf-Man and he is as tragic as ever. Cowboy actor Glenn Strange takes a turn as Dr. Frankenstein’s creation. The boys run afoul of Dracula, Frankenstein’s monster and Talbot’s werewolf in what is more comedy than horror. This 1948 film just might be Abbott and Costello’s best.

MV5BMTEwNjg2MjM2ODFeQTJeQWpwZ15BbWU4MDQ1MDU5OTEx._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,645,1000_AL_1. Young Frankenstein

I can practically quote this one by heart. I adore this movie. Gene Wilder is at his best in this 1974 Mel Brooks film. The usual suspects – Marty Feldman, Cloris Leachman, Madeline Kahn, Terri Garr, Kenneth Mars, and Peter Boyle – are all pitch perfect in this send-up/mash-up of Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein. Filmed in black and white, the movie pays tribute to the great Universal horror films of the 1930s and early 1940s. Feldman, as Igor, chews scenery, literally in one memorable moment with Kahn, and steals every scene he is in. Wilder’s exchange with Leachman’s Frau Blücher upon his arrival at the castle is hilarious. Boyle is wonderful as the monster and Mars’ Inspector Kemp pays homage to the original film’s sequels. Gene Hackman is a delight as the blind hermit. There are too many great scenes to mention and too many lines to quote here.

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