Newer Films with Potential and a Unique Take on Vampires

Last night I kicked off the reboot of My 100 Favorite Horror Films with a couple of Hammer Horror vampire classics and a newer film I like very much. Tonight, the countdown continues with two relatively new films and a movie that brought a unique perspective to vampire lore and stories. Different is the theme for this evening, but you won’t see It Follows anywhere on this countdown. What a terrible disappointment that was.

There was a time when numerous films came out that sure looked and sounded like vampire movies, but the antagonist was something … else. Roger Corman’s Wasp Woman character had vampiric tendencies, as did Hammer’s The Reptile.

MV5BY2NiNTkzN2YtY2IyOC00NjQwLWIyYTItYzc0OWIxMzc4YTBlXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTQxNzMzNDI@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,674,1000_AL_97. The Lair of The White Worm
1988

Perhaps no other film I’ve seen plays on these concepts like Wasp Woman and The Reptile quite like The Lair of the White Worm. Virginal sacrifices, a giant snake, flashbacks to Roman debauchery, a young Hugh Grant, an emerging Sammi Davis, and Amanda Donohoe (with whom I happen to share a birthday) in all her pre-LA Law lesbian lawyer glory as a snake-like vampire creature. Donohoe really vamps it up while preying on the populace of a small burg.

The plot involves a local legend and folklore with Grant playing the role of a lord whose ancestor tangled with a predecessor of the title’s D’Ampton worm.

I personally find a lot of charm in this film. It has been awhile since I’ve seen it and it is time to view it again. The pub band and song that tells the legend of the D’Ampton worm is one of the best parts of the movie. I’ll share it here.

96. Sinister
2012

I have never liked Ethan Hawke. Ever since Reality Bites, I don’t like him. I don’t know what it is, I can’t put my finger on it. But when I saw the trailer for Sinister, I really didn’t care who was in it, I was going to see the movie. And Hawke is good in this. Sinister reminded me of why I don’t go see scary movies by myself. Yes, it is a touch predictable, and it leaves you wondering what the hell has happened to Vincent D’Onofrio, but what I like about it is its attempt at being something different. There is a confusing plot point at the end but don’t let that get in the way of you enjoying this well-made film.

Hawke plays a true crime writer who moves his family into the murder house on which he is basing his new book. Obviously, this doesn’t sit none too well with the missus. Before long, the family falls victim to a demon.

There are some unique elements to this one. I like the use of home movies as an inter-dimensional vehicle for the demon. There are plenty of jump scares to go along with true moments of horrific suspense. The late Fred Thompson makes one of his last screen appearances as the local sheriff. Just don’t watch this one alone.

MV5BMTUyNzkwMzAxOF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMzc1OTk1NjE@._V1_SY1000_SX675_AL_95. The Witch, or The VVitch: A New England Folktale
2015

I really wanted to love this movie. Hell, I struggled to like it as first. I had to watch it more than once. This was on my radar early on. A24 studios is really trying to carve out a niche and this was almost a case of the trailer being better than the movie. Set in the 1600s, the dialogue is thick and hard to navigate, as is the plot at times. It is beautifully shot if you enjoy deep dark woods and ominous gray skies.

The pace is what killed me. It is a slow burn, and I mean a slooooooooow burn. Anya Taylor-Joy, Morgan and Split, plays what ends up becoming the main character. She does a wonderful job portraying a descent from innocence, purity and piety into desire, temptation, sin and evil. However, there is a little too much telling and not enough showing during key moments.

I do love the setting, the atmosphere, the aesthetic. It is a dark and gritty film and I love all the things that it is trying to be. Ralph Ineson’s gravelly voice and dogged determination to maintain the attempt at period-accurate dialogue is painful to understand at times. But there are witches and there is plenty of witchery afoot. If you want something different, this might be the film for you.

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