Time to Reset the Mechanism

cbe9caa6_9ecc00fd_ed08_4397_856e_026310109756Weight is a sneaky thing. It creeps up on you when you least expect it. It appears in the strangest places. It makes your clothes tight and increases your appetite. It’s fed by apathy, inattention and distraction. If you’re not careful, you’ll wake up obese.

Just over four years ago I woke up obese. A victim of lethargy, opiate entertainment, stress and fatigue, I had put on a disturbing amount of weight. After reflection and contemplation, I hatched a plan and was determined to rectify the situation.

Opiate

Noun

3. Anything that causes dullness or inaction or that soothes the feelings.

I figured out how to incorporate exercise into my schedule and I resolved to eat better and less. For the most part I was successful. I lost 60 pounds, shrunk several inches and had to replace my wardrobe with smaller, better fitting clothes. Throughout the process many people remarked that they were amazed that I was able to keep the weight off. It took 11 months to reach my first major goal and another several to reach 180 pounds. My lightest weight was 176 and I was quite pleased at 180. I loved the way my clothes fit; I had swagger and confidence.

hungry05This journey has not been smooth sailing by any stretch of the imagination. Two surgeries, including back surgery, shin splints, strained muscles, and numerous aches and pains have dotted the map along the way. Back surgery took place in May 2015 and I was able to maintain 180 pounds throughout the recovery process. However, when I resumed exercise, I began to gain weight. Slowly. A half a pound here, a half a pound there. I’ve never really got too far off track with my exercise. Sure, an injury or a strain here or there, work or family commitments knocked me off the path temporarily but never for very long. It’s always been my diet that derailed me.

From the day I quit smoking in 2008, nutrition has either been my enemy or my friend. I’ve read this comment in numerous places with a few variations and I believe it wholeheartedly – you can’t outrun or out-exercise a bad diet. In a recent Good Morning America story on Oprah Winfrey’s latest victory in the battle of the bulge, statistics reveal that many people regain lost weight after two years. Well, I’m right at that point and unfortunately I have regained almost 20 pounds from my fighting weight. The scale read 198 today. To be fair to myself, I just went through a one-week creatine load-in phase, which results in water retention. But, that’s only a few pounds.

The GMA piece is eye opening. The “lower third” graphic does not specify how much weight is regained, and implies “all.” I’ll never cross 200 pounds again, I’ll never climb back to 236, ain’t gonna happen.

Although this weight gain has snuck up on me, it’s didn’t take five years for me to notice this time. It took a few months. And I think I caught it in time. I have written previously that I was back in weight loss mode after discovering that I had put on a few pounds. It may seem a bit hypocritical for me to proclaim that now. But that’s what I’m doing. It has to happen. There is no not doing it.

So, what happened? How self-aware am I? Well. What I can tell you is that, starting last summer, I got complacent with food and alcohol. I have never been one to drink a whole helluva lot but between pool parties and entertaining, I ate too much and drank too much. This carried into the fall and into the holidays. Eventually, I got off track with running. You can read all the bodybuilding web sites and magazine you want and they’ll all tell you to avoid steady-rate cardio. They’ll all tell you the High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is better. They’ll all tell you strength training is the way to do. Some may tell you that some cardio is okay or necessary. Runner’s World magazine tells runners that they need strength training.

It’s all a racket. This one will tell you that you need 1.21 gigawatts of protein a day while they try to sell you protein powder. The other one tells you you need to run while they try to sell you Air Zoom Max Glide Trip-Its with mink uppers and gold soles to help you run faster.

I have covered information overload previously and it is real. I love the fact that information is available at my fingertips, but it can be a bit much to get through. What you have to understand is that we are all different. What works for me may not work for you. I am 47, I smoked for 18 years, I was obese, I have high cholesterol and triglycerides, and I have sleep apnea. My metabolism is my own. My body composition is my own.

My favorite comedian Lewis Black once ranted about health. His point was that we are all different. My point is that I need to go back and look at what I was doing when I was successful. And I need to adopt the philosophy that the nutrition I use to lose weight has to be my nutritional philosophy forever. That’s where this whole thing went sideways, that’s the rub, that’s where it fell down. The graphic on the GMA piece read “set-point” theory was the reason people regain weight. What does that mean exactly?

According to mirror-mirror.org:

“Set point is the weight range in which your body is programmed to function optimally. Set point theory holds that one’s body will fight to maintain that weight range.

Everyone has a set point and, just as you have no control over your height, eye color or hair color, you also have no control over what your set point will be. Your body is biologically and genetically determined to weigh within a certain weight range.”

Other sources indicate that it is possible to change that set point. And, I think, I changed mine for quite awhile. However, I had changed it for the negative. Fortunately I was able to change it again in the positive direction and that helped me keep the weight off for a year and a half. Now, my set point has changed again. My body wants me in the 195-200 range. I disagree. It is time to reset the mechanism and this time, I can’t forget one of my mantras. Your body doesn’t need as many calories as you think it does. Especially as you get older.

img_0471I have my own definition of “set-point.” I thought I was done. I thought I was at “set-point” in the game. One more and I win. You bust your ass to lose all the weight you want to lose, you get to your goal and you think you’re done. Or, you can back off. You think you can have that cookie, or that brownie, or a second piece of pie. I had to force myself to learn moderation. I lean toward the higher end and that has led to this weight gain.

I consume information on these topics and even though I don’t follow everything I read, I think some of this information has seeped into my consciousness and affects my eating habits. The exercise web sites and magazines will tell you about fueling your body, especially to work out. Then there’s the information about macronutrients and ratios of fat, carbohydrates and protein.

I think that if I lift weights and run enough that I’ll burn off what I consume. I must grossly overestimate how many calories I burn each day despite tracking this data with my Fitbit Charge HR. As I mentioned, I have not gotten too far off track with exercise in the last four years. Good nutrition and exercise are still an important part of my life. Yes, I indulge. Yes, I drink.

img_0464So, after trying to get back in the habit the last few months, I have had a great two weeks of weight lifting sessions. I haven’t missed a workout in two weeks. Twelve really good lifts in 13 days – Sunday is my rest day. I got a non-stop three-mile run in today. My last two runs were terrible. I can’t tell you the importance of good running shoes, and after almost 300 miles the spring in my Asics Kayano 21s finally sprung. After several days of shopping I finally settled on Asics Cumulus 17s. My first run in them was good from a shoe standpoint. They certainly solved my lower leg pain problem from my last two runs.

Now, today’s run was not good. I can’t lie. It was slow and painful. I guess that’s what I get for running the day after legs night. But it was non-stop and it was a good first step in getting back to my running regimen. The weight I’ve put obviously has an effect on my running. The weight also might be affecting my sleeping as well. Afternoon and evening fatigue have reared their ugly heads and I think the extra pounds are affecting sleep apnea events.

As proud of myself I am for getting the past two weeks done in my little gym, it is merely the beginning. All that swagger, all that confidence, and all that machismo I had? Gone. My competition with the poster on the wall? The poster has landed a few haymakers of late. I hit the canvass. But you know what?

I’ll get back up and I’ll keep coming.

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